juneau_30732438016_o

Never in my wildest dreams did I ever think I would be visiting Alaska in the near future. (Don’t get me wrong though, my dreams of gallivanting around the world includes exploring Alaska, I just didn’t think it would happen so soon!) Although I was only able to visit one city and two towns, I am still so grateful for this travel opportunity. I’ve decided to separate my Alaskan experience into two blog posts since compressing it into one would only hold me back from expressing everything (or like blabbing away), on the account of worrying about having a long post. So stay tuned!

Processed with VSCO with c1 preset

“Is it true you can see Russia from your window?” Seeing Russia from the Alaskan windowsills is apparently a common misconception, considering Alaska is in fact only 55 miles away from Russia at its the narrowest point. The whole relationship between Russia and Alaska started when the Russian government sold Alaska to the US, after the war between Russia and UK broke out.

Juneau, taking after the once famous gold prospector Joe Juneau, is Alaska’s capital city. As mentioned by almost EVERY tour guide/Alaskan native, Juneau is apparently the only state capital in the US that can only be reached by plane and/or boat. The whole feel of Juneau being a settlement for gold-miners back in the day is still present today through the preserved buildings and streets around the coastal city. This, I honestly loved so much. I love when the history of a certain place is preserved and can still vividly be felt.

img_7937Right after docking, I went to the Tourist Center and asked which way downtown Juneau was and the guy said, that’s it–what you’re seeing now,  that’s downtown Juneau. I was honestly surprised because according to the map we were given, getting to downtown Juneau would take quite a while (which was a total exaggeration) and there’s no other way to get there but walk. I know this isn’t a big deal and I don’t have a problem with walking but I was with my grandparents and my biggest concern was the fact that my grandma couldn’t walk far. ANYWAY.

MOUNT ROBERTS TRAMWAY

Processed with VSCO with c1 preset

We hopped on to the Mount Roberts Tramway, the only aerial tram in the State and only operates from May to September (which in other words is the only time Alaska is flocked by tourists). 1,800 feet above, we were able to get a clear view of Juneau, the Gastineau Channel, and of course, miles and miles of trees. It was breathtaking.

Since we arrived around lunchtime, we decided to look for a place to eat at. Atop Mount Roberts was a restaurant called Timberline Bar & Grill, which you can bet served authentic Alaskan specialties. The restaurant was almost empty when we got there, so I asked the maitre’d if we could be seated by the window to enjoy the view while having lunch. I ordered a deep-fried Halibut Burger (I was in Alaska after all) I remember that particular lunch clearly — it was the first time I got the whole ~Alaskan feel.~

img_7921
A common sight in Alaska — skinned bear rug

A couple of steps away from the restaurant was a trail and a small cottage — the Nature Center by Gastineau Guiding — which was filled with souvenirs, organic products, plants, and maps, and they offer hot cider to visitors too. It was so cozy and quiet even though it was completely packed. It was so perfect especially since it was gloomy and it even started drizzling. I wish I lived in a little cottage like that, always staying in all bundled up in a thick blanket, sipping a cup of hot chocolate.

img_5545

A few steps away from the Nature Center, there’s a trail that leads to a meadow hidden within the multitude of trees surrounding it. Unfortunately though, I wasn’t able to go due to the crazy cold weather, the rain, and my outfit that was just not suitable for the rain and mud. But I can just imagine how beautiful the wildflowers must have been and the crisp air… You have no idea how much I regret not taking that hike.

Processed with VSCO with c1 preset
Collection of stationaries that would be perfect for souvenirs.

The Raven Eagle Gifts & Gallery boasts quality gifts and souvenirs that perfectly depict everything Alaska. I so badly wanted to buy a couple of those stationaries (the one with “Yoggatta do this,” the one with “Nature Lover”, and the one that says “Putt it on the list”) but they were a little pricey (because like I said, this store is all about quality) so I decided to just wait until we get to go around the souvenir shops downtown.

img_7920
A totem pole in the works outside the git shop

Back in the day, totem poles served as a way of letting travelers on canoes know important information about the tribe settled in a particular area. Some totem poles contain the history of a particular tribe, people and their experiences, historic events, stories, all depicted through colorful carvings. I’ll save all the other stuff I learned about totem poles in my next post ;-P

MENDENHALL GLACIER

Processed with VSCO with m5 preset
Mendenhall Glacier or Sitaantaagu, meaning “The Glacier Behind the Town

About 20 minutes away from downtown Juneau, Mendenhall Glacier lies peacefully. We hopped on a bus and paid $30 each for a trip to and from the park. We didn’t have to pay a fee to walk up close to the glacier, but even if we did, it would’ve been worth it, I mean it’s not everyday you get to see one of Mother Nature’s beautiful works up close!

The glacier was so beautiful, I was honestly mesmerized. (Then again almost everything in Alaska completely mesmerized me…) Apparently though, much like all the other glaciers, Mendenhall Glacier has been receding over the years and there will come a time the massive glacier will just melt into a lake. So. I realized how extremely grateful I am to have been given the opportunity to travel and see one of the many wonders in the world. (TYL <3)

DOWNTOWN JUNEAU

img_7936

Like I’ve mentioned earlier, downtown Juneau can be reached within 5 minutes and really, it just depends on how fast you walk and which berth your shipped is docked on. Following the boardwalk, South Franklin Street along downtown emerges and marks the beginning of the long stretch of souvenir shops, restaurants, bookstores, and city landmarks.

Processed with VSCO with c1 preset

Both sides of the road are lined with shops specifically designed to attract tourists (mainly cruisers). It was a breeze walking around, what with the cold yet bearable weather and the vibe that the place gives. I loved how everything was preserved, the architecture, the presence of the place once being a settlement for miners, the undeniable presence of local tribes, how the city sleeps through the cold, winter months and wakes in spring, right when the tourists arrive. Juneau made it feel like I went back in time and it was amazing.

(ok my bad I got carried away) So. When I was walking around with my grandma, the farthest we reached along South Franklin Street was the Red Dog Saloon and it’s one of those establishments that you just have to take a photo of when you see it. So I took a quick photo, didn’t bother going inside, but still tried to peek a little.

img_7926
The famous Red Dog Saloon right down the middle of downtown Juneau

We started walking back and I decided to have ice cream despite the crazy cold weather and it was AMAZING. I was a little iffy about ordering Spruce Tip (since I’ve never had anything spruce before) and oh my sweet lord it was the best ice cream I’ve ever had.

img_7928
Right next to the ice cream stall was a popcorn stand and I don’t really need to discuss how enticing the smell of fresh popcorn is, right? I feel like my grandma saw my face change so she insisted I buy some popcorn to bring back to the ship with me. So yeah I ended up getting two bags–plain and caramel.

We decided to get coffee and biscuits, sit in one of those benches along the street, relax and take everything in.

img_7929
Coffee and Madeleines

After a while, I decided to head back and explore the farther side of downtown Juneau, since my grandma and I weren’t able to cover it. I followed the boardwalk and with my tiny map up my nose, I navigated downtown Juneau on foot. I made it a point to check out the landmarks written on the maps.

img_7943
There are apparently 20 of these signs but I’ll be honest with you, I think I may have only seen about five of these since it wasn’t until I was on my way back that I noticed them.
img_7938
Take a look at those pretty buildings, would you? So classic, so beautiful. It adds so much charm to the city.
img_7939
Container ships to cruise ships to airplane boats…you name it. You can see them all by the port.

img_7941

img_7955

I didn’t really purchase anything while I was walking around, I mean it was our first stop for the cruise so I thought I would just buy souvenirs later. Really, I just wanted to take everything in, and capture the beauty of the place.

img_7942

img_7953

img_7949
A statue of a bear and his catch, a salmon. Very Alaska, haha!

Alaska is one of the US states that still has a large number of Native American tribes and I love how instead of making their existence taboo, the local government and tribes make a collective effort to preserve their culture and traditions, like how you would see totem poles right by government buildings!

img_7951
I walked and walked and walked until I found the Governor’s Mansion. It was listed as one of the top attractions in Juneau and since I was already out and about, I decided to go and check it out.

img_7952

img_7954
I used to see these boards on Tumblr and I’ve always wanted to write on one so I took the liberty! PS. It’s the one with the polar bear 🙂
Processed with VSCO with c1 preset
This is probably my favorite part of downtown Juneau because of the street clock.
img_7925
Matryoshka Dolls — a Russian handicraft, on display at a souvenir store. The Russian influence is still quite strong around Alaska, which makes the State all the more unique.
img_7958
I wanted to bring this Christmas tree home, honestly.

img_7957

I’d just like to note how nice it is to see that traces of Russian culture and the Native American culture are still embedded in the culture today in Juneau.

img_7959

Advertisements